Questions to Consider When Hiring a Solution-Focused Trainer

There are so many people saying they are providing solution-focused training. Are they all really using Solution-Focused Brief Therapy?

It is very common for professionals to combine Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) with other approaches and philosophies. Because of this, SFBT is commonly confused with problem solving approaches, motivational interviewing, and strength-based approaches. Some clues that the training might not be based on the original, evidenced-based, Solution-Focused Brief Therapy are words like “solution-oriented” or “solution-based.” In addition, we now have the international organization, IASTI (International Alliance of Solution-Focused Teaching Institutes). This organization helps those seeking training to readily identify training institutes who are known for teaching the model according to these original standards. Denver Center for SFBT is a member of this organization and currently certifies professionals in SFBT.

How important is it that what I learn is based on the original approach as developed by Insoo Kim Berg and Steve de Shazer?

It really depends on what is important to you. It may not be important at all depending on your goals in wanting to learn SFBT. However, it is important to know that one can only get the amazing results with the most difficult clients as documented in research and on video tapes and during demonstrations when SFBT is learned as it was originally developed. SFBT is an evidenced-based approach, and needs to be learned correctly in order to obtain the results documented in the research. When it is combined with other approaches or when the interventions are used outside of the unique mindset, it becomes watered down and less effective. While it may work with the easy clients and simple problems, it will not work with the complex and chronic issues unless it is learned with the precision and purpose that can only be taught by those who teach it in its purest form.

How can I tell if something really is SFBT?

There are a lot of myths out there. For example, I’ve recently read something that said that what differentiates SFBT from other approaches is that SFBT is short term and episodic. While these two facts are often true about SFBT, they certainly aren’t unique to the approach. Even some of the solution-focused interventions such as Scaling, Difference Questions, and Relationship Questions can be found in other approaches.

What makes SFBT different and unique is actually very simple. Traditional treatment begins with the problem and seeks to find a solution. Solution-Focused Brief Therapy takes a very different approach. Instead, in SFBT, treatment is done beginning from a clear description of the desired goal and working backwards. Because of this, hope that change is possible is increased, disbelief is suspended, and the client’s natural way of thinking is respected in an environment of creative accountability. This accountability comes from the solution-focused professional asking Relationship Questions in a systemic way of thinking. This helps clients to evaluate possible decisions and think critically as they implement the steps they envisioned when thinking from this future place; a place in which the problems are resolved.

What’s important for me to know when choosing a good solution-focused trainer or consultant?

First, it is important to know what your goal is in seeking these services. How would you know the trainer had done a good job? What would let you know that the training made a difference? If you are seeking consultation or on-site training, make sure and talk to the trainer prior to hiring them. Are they willing to design a training based on your specific goals/needs? Are they listening to you and curious about who you are and what’s important to you? A good solution-focused trainer uses these same solution-focused principles and way of working while teaching these skills to others.

Second, chose a trainer or consultant who has experience helping people obtain outcomes that are similar to your own goals. In addition, look for someone who will use live demonstrations and hands on teaching methods rather than videos and static teaching approaches. Solution-Focused Brief Therapy is something that participants need to experience. It looks and sounds overly simple, and a good trainer will welcome impromptu role plays and “what if . . . s.” These are necessary in order to help participants see how this way of working can be effective with the toughest clients.

Third, make sure that the trainer/consultant believes and can clearly explain how and why this approach can work with the toughest client. If the trainer says that this approach will not work with a certain population, walk away. While a good solution-focused trainer believes that other methods and approaches can be very effective with clients, they will also believe SFBT will work just as effectively. However, most importantly . . . they can show you how it can work (through impromptu demonstration) and then explain the basic principles behind the change they demonstrate.

Lastly, make sure the trainer/consultant is open to continued contact and resources once the training is over. Learning SFBT is a process, and on-going questions come up. A good trainer wants to stay in contact and support those in the learning process.

E-mail questions or request more information about our solution-focused therapy training: tpichot@denversolutions.com